In this episode of our employment podcast, we look at the recent Court of Appeal case of Gwynedd Council v Barratt and the question of whether (or when) an employer should offer a right of appeal on a redundancy dismissal in order to avoid a claim of unfair dismissal.

Listen to it here: https://www.mayerbrown.com/en/perspectives-events/podcasts/2021/09/do-employers-have-to-offer-a-right-of-appeal-on-redundancy

In the latest episode of our employment podcast, we look at the recent EAT case of Kong v Gulf International Bank, where a whistleblower claimed that their dismissal was unfair because it had been manipulated by a manager who was not involved in the dismissal process. Listen to it here: https://www.mayerbrown.com/en/perspectives-events/podcasts/2021/09/whistleblower-manipulation–limiting-the-jhuti-principle

In episode 208 of our Employment podcast, Christopher Fisher is looking at two recent discrimination cases dealing with two important issues – will interim relief remedies be introduced for discrimination claims and will gender-critical beliefs be protected as philosophical beliefs.  One case is from the EAT and one from the Court of Appeal.  You can

In an eagerly anticipated update, the Home Office has announced that the Covid-19 adjustment to the right to work check will no longer end on 20 June 2021 but will be extended to 1 September 2021.  Read here for our full blog post:

https://www.mobilework.law/2021/06/a-welcome-and-longer-than-expected-extension-to-the-covid-19-uk-right-to-work-check-concession/

In our latest podcast, we look at an unfair dismissal case about an employee who refused to return to work due to Covid-related safety concerns, and a case about mandatory vaccination policies and whether they can amount to a breach of human rights.

https://www.mayerbrown.com/en/perspectives-events/podcasts/2021/05/episode-206–a-view-from-mayer-brown–returning-to-work-from-lockdown–two-recent-cases

As an update to our recent post, the Home Office has now pushed back the date for the changes to Right to Work checks required by UK employers.  The new rules will now begin on 21 June rather than 18 May, as had previously been proposed.

Please click here to read the update by James

Since March last year, due to Covid-19, the Home Office has allowed employers to check an employee’s immigration status in the UK by using scans or copies of documents instead of having to see the original documents.  From 17 May, this adjustment will cease and employers will once again be required to check original documents,