For a third consecutive year, the London head of Employment at Mayer Brown, Nicholas Robertson, has edited and contributed a preface and chapter on the UK in the latest edition of The Labour and Employment Disputes Review.
The book, published by The Law Reviews in March 2020, is a yearly review of procedure, key

The Supreme Court is set to be busy with employment law cases in 2020. Below, we take a look at some of the most important cases coming up this year and why they are significant.

Various claimants v Wm Morrisons Supermarket

In this case, which is the first group litigation to be brought in the

A case was decided this week in the London Central Employment Tribunal (Dewhurst v Revisecatch) which has dramatic ramifications for employers. The Tribunal’s decision is that, where there is a transfer covered by the Transfer Regulations, individuals who are properly classified as “workers” are covered by the Transfer Regulations.

The Transfer Regulations apply to anyone

The Supreme Court has today released its decision in the whistleblowing case of Royal Mail Group v Jhuti.  The case concerns the unfair dismissal protection for whistleblowers, which provides that a dismissal will be unfair if the reason for it (or the main reason) is that the employee has made a whistleblowing disclosure.  The question

As you may be aware, since February 2017, all Employment Tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal judgments have been published on an online register on the gov.uk website. A recent case in the Court of Appeal has confirmed that, other than in cases of national security, the online register will always maintain a copy of any

As mentioned in our earlier posts, we will be featuring contributions from our global Employment & Benefits team on this blog, highlighting particular topics and issues of interest to UK employers with operations overseas.

Here is some recent commentary and guidance from our Employment & Benefits team in Hong Kong:

  • Our Employment & Benefits team

Our latest blog post reviews two important developments in the calculation of holiday pay. First, the Government announced late last year that it will extend the reference period for calculating holiday pay. Second, the recent decision in Flowers v East of England Ambulance Trust clarifies the uncertainty surrounding whether voluntary overtime should be included in

Recent determinations of the Pensions Ombudsman¹ have considered the extent to which employers should provide information on pension rights to employees who have notified them of a terminal illness.

The law

There is no general duty on employers to advise employees about their pension rights, or to safeguard employees’ economic well-being. Indeed, the law prohibits anyone other than a person authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority from advising on pension rights.

However, a distinction should be drawn between “advising” and “providing information”. In some situations the law imposes specific duties on employers to provide information about pension rights to employees. When the law is silent, however, getting things right can be tricky.


Continue Reading Providing information about pensions to terminally ill employees – how far should employers go?