Defined benefit (DB) pension schemes promise their members a pension for life. However, while one member may live to age 75, another might live to age 95. When working out how much money a DB scheme needs to fund the benefits it has promised members, trustees (or rather their actuarial advisers) therefore have to make an assumption about how long, on average, members will live – a longevity assumption.

If that longevity assumption proves to be incorrect and the scheme has to pay benefits for longer than expected, the trustees will need to find additional money to fund those benefits. And usually they will look to the scheme’s sponsoring employer for that money.

Finding ways of managing a scheme’s longevity risk is therefore beneficial for both the trustees and the employer. One way of doing this is a transaction called a longevity swap. Between 2009 and 2018, nearly 50 pension schemes entered into longevity swaps, including schemes sponsored by Astra Zeneca, AkzoNobel, BA, BAE Systems, BMW, BT, Heineken, ITV and Rolls-Royce.


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Recent intervention by the Competition and Markets Authority could lead to increased competition in the market for investment professionals who provide services to pension schemes – which should be a good thing for the employers supporting those schemes.

Many occupational pension schemes use the services of investment consultants and / or fiduciary managers.  Broadly, investment consultants advise pension scheme trustees on how best to invest scheme assets – and fiduciary managers make investment decisions on behalf of pension scheme trustees.


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On 6 April, the quality requirements that pension schemes being used for automatic enrolment (“qualifying schemes”) must meet are changing.

DC schemes – what’s changing?

At present, for a DC scheme to be a qualifying scheme:

  • The employer must make a contribution of at least 2% of the worker’s qualifying earnings.
  • The total contributions paid

Superfunds are a hot topic right now in the pensions industry. A consultation on the regulation of superfunds has recently closed, and a response from the Government is expected in the near future. But what are superfunds, and why might they be of interest to an employer with a defined benefit (DB) pension scheme?

What is a “superfund”?

  • A superfund is an occupational pension scheme which will, at a cost, accept a transfer of assets and liabilities from a DB pension scheme.
  • It’s a relatively new concept – there aren’t currently any operational superfunds, although market entrants are actively seeking business.
  • The entity running the superfund will be aiming to make a profit and distribute returns to external investors.  The expectation is that this can be achieved through cost efficiencies, better access to investment opportunities and the pooling of risk.
  • They will be regulated by the Pensions Regulator (although the authorisation framework is not yet in place) and the intention is that they will be eligible for the PPF.


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You may have seen recent – sensationalist – media headlines like:

“’We’re coming for you’ – Amber Rudd’s warning for bosses reckless with employee pensions” (ITV News)
“Reckless bosses who put workers’ pensions in danger could be jailed for seven years” (The Mirror)
Seven-year jail terms unveiled for pension fund mismanagement” (The Guardian)

The

Employers and trustees who use a guarantee or charge to reduce their pension scheme’s Pension Protection Fund (PPF) levy may need to re-execute that guarantee/charge in order for it to be taken into account in calculating the scheme’s 2019/20 PPF levy.

The PPF provides protection for members of DB pension schemes whose sponsoring employer becomes insolvent. It is funded in part by an annual levy payable by DB pension schemes.


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