A case was decided this week in the London Central Employment Tribunal (Dewhurst v Revisecatch) which has dramatic ramifications for employers. The Tribunal’s decision is that, where there is a transfer covered by the Transfer Regulations, individuals who are properly classified as “workers” are covered by the Transfer Regulations.

The Transfer Regulations apply to anyone

The Supreme Court has today released its decision in the whistleblowing case of Royal Mail Group v Jhuti.  The case concerns the unfair dismissal protection for whistleblowers, which provides that a dismissal will be unfair if the reason for it (or the main reason) is that the employee has made a whistleblowing disclosure.  The question

In June 2019, the Women and Equalities Select Committee (WESC) published its report on the use of non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) in discrimination and harassment cases. This week, the Government’s response to that report has been published.

The Government had previously (in July) published its proposals for new legislation regarding the use of NDAs, and the

As you may be aware, since February 2017, all Employment Tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal judgments have been published on an online register on the gov.uk website. A recent case in the Court of Appeal has confirmed that, other than in cases of national security, the online register will always maintain a copy of any

Our latest blog post reviews two important developments in the calculation of holiday pay. First, the Government announced late last year that it will extend the reference period for calculating holiday pay. Second, the recent decision in Flowers v East of England Ambulance Trust clarifies the uncertainty surrounding whether voluntary overtime should be included in

Since July 2017 when the Supreme Court abolished the requirement to pay a fee to issue a claim in the Employment Tribunal, there has been a steady increase in the number of claims issued in the Employment Tribunal, although the numbers are yet to reach the levels we saw before the fees regime was introduced.

On Friday (24 May) the Court of Appeal delivered its decision in the cases of Capita v Ali and Hextall v Chief Constable of Leicestershire.  In both cases, male employees claimed sex discrimination on the basis that their employer’s shared parental leave (SPL) policies provided the statutory rate of SPL pay to employees taking

In the wake of #MeToo and the associated shift in the way allegations of sexual harassment are treated by employers, making the decision to suspend an employee can have far-reaching repercussions for employers and employees alike.

Importantly, in 2007, the Court of Appeal, in Mezey v South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS