Since July 2017 when the Supreme Court abolished the requirement to pay a fee to issue a claim in the Employment Tribunal, there has been a steady increase in the number of claims issued in the Employment Tribunal, although the numbers are yet to reach the levels we saw before the fees regime was introduced.

On Friday (24 May) the Court of Appeal delivered its decision in the cases of Capita v Ali and Hextall v Chief Constable of Leicestershire.  In both cases, male employees claimed sex discrimination on the basis that their employer’s shared parental leave (SPL) policies provided the statutory rate of SPL pay to employees taking

In the wake of #MeToo and the associated shift in the way allegations of sexual harassment are treated by employers, making the decision to suspend an employee can have far-reaching repercussions for employers and employees alike.

Importantly, in 2007, the Court of Appeal, in Mezey v South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS

The case of Hargreaves v Department for Work and Pensions provides a useful reminder of what employers should keep in mind when managing an employee with a disability, including the following:

  • Discuss suitable reasonable adjustments at the very first opportunity and seek input from the employee’s treating health professional and occupational health as well as

At the end of January 2019, the Government launched a consultation which proposes plans to boost the protection given during redundancy to pregnant women and new parents returning to work.   Under the current law, before making an employee on maternity leave redundant, employers are under an obligation to offer them a suitable alternative vacancy where