HM Treasury has just announced a change to the Job Support Scheme which comes into force from 1 November for the whole of the UK. Previously, employees had to be working 33% of their hours to qualify, with the employer then picking up 33% of the cost of the unworked hours, and the Government paying

With a second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic seemingly well underway and restrictions tightening across the country, it is without doubt that remote working will continue to be the norm for many employees for the foreseeable future. The potential issues this raises for employers in relation to data security and the protection of confidential information

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the UK Government made the decision to delay the implementation of IR35 reforms to the private sector from April 2020 until April 2021 (see our previous blog post on this here). As a reminder, the IR35 reforms (commonly referred to as the “off-payroll working rules”) are intended to apply to any individual who, but for the supply of their services through an intermediary, would otherwise be an employee of the end-user client receiving the service. These rules will impact medium and large businesses in their role as the end-user client. From 6 April 2021, private sector businesses will become responsible for determining the employment status of contractors, regardless of whether they supply their services through a personal service company directly to the end-user or via an agency. The new rules will effectively see a shift in current responsibility on status determination, from the contractor to the end-user client. The changes will not apply to small businesses that engage contractors through an intermediary.

Continue Reading IR35 reforms update: Make sure you are ready for 6 April 2021

The Job Security Scheme – announced 24 September 2020

The Chancellor has announced his “Furlough 2.0” – a wage subsidy programme called the Job Support Scheme (“JSS”). The aim, of course, is to help UK employers weather the continuing COVID-19 storm, with the hope of saving jobs or at least staving off mass redundancies when

The topic of employers looking to change employment contract terms is becoming increasingly important as we move towards the end of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and beyond. This article provides a brief summary of the key steps involved in implementing contractual changes, in particular, in a dismissal and re-engagement scenario.

The UK unemployment

New legislation came into force on 31 July 2020 to ensure that employees who are on furlough will be entitled to receive their statutory redundancy payments based on their normal wages, rather than on any reduced salary while on furlough. However, there has been no change to the cap on a week’s pay for the

In a world where we can no longer host in person events without following all of the latest government guidelines on social distancing, use of face masks and providing a bucket-load of hand sanitizer, online learning tools such as webinars, podcasts, blogs and vlogs, are having their time in the limelight. With this new era, comes new opportunity.
Continue Reading UK Employment Law podcaster Nicholas Robertson hosts pandemic related broadcasts produced by the Employment Lawyers Association and the Industrial Law Society

On Friday 26 June 2020 the UK Government published the Third Direction, which is the legislative update for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. In particular, it implements the flexible working arrangements which are permitted from 1 July 2020 under the Furlough Scheme.

We have now reviewed this Direction in full and provide a summary of